SCSI - All about

connectors SCSI
connectors SCSI

Small Computer System Interface

SCSI, is a standard defining a computer bus connecting a computer to another computer or devices.


The standard describes the mechanical, electrical and functional bus specifications.


There is the standard SCSI-1, SCSI-2 and SCSI-3.
Orders sent to the device can be complex
Orders sent to the device can be complex

Specificities

This bus differs from others in that it deported the complexity to the device itself. Thus, orders sent to the device can be complex, the device should then (eventually) break them down into simpler tasks, which is advantageous if we work with multitasking operating systems.

This interface is faster, more universal and more complex interface E-IDE including the main disadvantage is to capture a sizable percentage of the processor, which is a handicap when many flows of data are simultaneously open.

Smarter and less dependent on the central unit, the SCSI interface can manage internal and external devices varied, such as hard drives, scanners
3D scanner
A three-dimensional scanner is a device that analyzes the objects or their immediate environment to gather specific information on the form and possibly on the appearance (color, texture) of these. The data collected can then be used to build CGI three-dimensional (digital objects) for various purposes.
These devices are much used by the industries of entertainment for movies or video games. Digital images of scanne
, recorders, backup units, etc.
The SCSI-2 standard specifies that the bus can connect computers with devices
The SCSI-2 standard specifies that the bus can connect computers with devices
The SCSI standards define the parameters of the input-output interfaces
The SCSI standards define the parameters of the input-output interfaces

The SCSI standards

The SCSI standards define the electrical parameters of the input-output interfaces. Standard SCSI-1 date of 1986, he defined standard commands that control SCSI devices on a bus clocked at 4.77 MHz with a width of 8-bit, allowing him to offer speeds of the order of 5 MB/s.

However a large number of these orders were optional, that's why in 94 standard
SCSI-2 was adopted. It defines 18 commands called CCS (Common Command Set). Various versions of the SCSI-2 standard have been defined :

-The Wide SCSI-2 is based on a 16-bit width (instead of 8) bus and allows us to offer a rate of 10 MB/s;
-Fast SCSI-2 is a fast synchronous mode allowing to spend 5 to 10 MB/s for the standard SCSI, and 10 to 20 MB/s for Wide SCSI-2 (named for the occasion Fast Wide SCSI-2);
-Fast-20 and 40 Fast modes allow respectively to double and quadruple those flows.

The SCSI-3 standard includes new commands, and allows chaining of 32 devices as well as a maximum of 320 MB/s (Ultra-320 mode).

The following table summarizes the characteristics of the different SCSI standards :
Norm Bus width Bus speed Bandwidth Connection
SCSI-1 - Fast-5 SCSI 8-bit 4.77 MHz 5 MB/sec 50-pin (unbalanced or differential bus)
SCSI-2 - Fast-10 SCSI 8-bit 10 MHz 10 MB/sec 50-pin (unbalanced or differential bus)
SCSI-2 - Wide 1 6-bit 10 MHz 20 MB/sec 50-pin (unbalanced or differential bus)
SCSI-2 - Fast Wide 32-bit 10 MHz 40 MB/sec 68-pin (unbalanced or differential bus)
SCSI-2 - Ultra SCSI-2 (Fast-20 SCSI) 8-bit 20 MHz 20 MB/sec 50-pin (unbalanced or differential bus)
SCSI-2 - Ultra Wide SCSI-2 16-bit 20 MHz 40 MB/sec -
SCSI-3 - Ultra-2 SCSI (Fast-40 SCSI) 8-bit 40 MHz 40 MB/sec -
SCSI-3 - Ultra-2 Wide SCSI 16-bit 40 MHz 80 MB/sec 68-pin (differential bus)
SCSI-3 - Ultra-160 (Ultra-3 SCSI or Fast-80 SCSI) 16-bit 80 MHz 160 MB/sec 68-pin (differential bus)
SCSI-3 - Ultra-320 (Ultra-4 SCSI or Fast-160 SCSI) 16-bit 80 MHz DDR 320 MB/sec 68-pin (differential bus)
SCSI-3 - Ultra-640 (Ultra-5 SCSI) 16-bit 80 MHz 640 MB/sec 68-pin (differential bus)


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